Parkinson played hand he was dealt

By Laurie Stone

Earl Parkinson of Roosevelt County had been a rancher all of his life. Growing up, he was shy and timid, but as he grew older he was known as being honest, easy going, and hardworking.
“He was a happy man,” said Wilma Parkinson, Earl’s wife. “He was liked by everyone, loved ranching and was a big talker.”
Earl Parkinson was born on March 20, 1922, in Jefferson, Mo., to Rosie and Aaron M. Parkinson.
His family moved to the Milnesand area when he was young. He started out working on the Eagle Hill Ranch and later moved to the Caprock Ranch where he became foreman. Parkinson spent 60 years working for the Davis family. Sharon Davis said he was a responsible person and was honest to a cent.
Earl married Wilma on Oct. 5, 1958, in Morton, Texas. He and Wilma were members of the Methodist Church.
Fern Gore, Parkinson’s niece, said he was one of a kind.
“I never saw him get mad and he didn’t complain,” Gore said. “He once broke his collarbone and he wouldn’t go to the doctor until a month later.
“It grew back crooked, of course, but he believed that whatever life gave you then you dealt with it and moved on.”
Those that knew him said he was an unbeatable character.
“He was just the kind of guy that you liked,” said Richard Parkinson, Earl’s brother. “If he had a dime to his name then so did you.”
Family members said he enjoyed hunting with family and friends, going to brandings, playing dominos and visiting.
His survivors include his wife; Wilma Bertram, a brother, Richard Parkinson of Mounds, Okla., and several nieces and nephews.