Boeing donates $10,000 to CCC program

By Marlena Hartz: Freedom Newspapers

A program intended to supply more teachers to public schools received a monetary boost from a well-known military aircraft manufacturer.

The Boeing Company donated $10,000 to the Clovis Community College Alternative Teacher Licensure Program, according to officials.

The funds will enable the college to fully develop the licensure program, according to CCC officials.

Officials said the money will be used for program supplies, evaluations, marketing and professional development.

Clovis Community College and Clovis Municipal Schools are partners in the licensure program. Designed by the Public Education Department, similar programs exist on a state and national level, officials said.

The program was implemented at CCC in 2004, according to CCC Liberal Arts Division Chair Jan Lloyd.

“Clovis is not in a hardship, necessarily, for teachers. There are people with degrees in other areas, but not in teaching. This allows them to get that teaching degree,” Lloyd said.

Graduates of the program have been hired in Clovis schools and rural schools, Lloyd said.

Any person who has earned a bachelor’s degree and above is eligible for the alternative licensure program. Approximately seven classes must be taken to receive an alternative degree, Lloyd said. Students must also pass a state exam to teach in New Mexico public schools, she said.

Training for Boeing’s unmanned aerial vehicle, the ScanEagle, began in Clovis in July. Portions of the training are held at Clovis Community College.

ScanEagle flight tests are conducted at the Bombing Range.
Freedom Newspapers

A program intended to supply more teachers to public schools received a monetary boost from a well-known military aircraft manufacturer.

The Boeing Company donated $10,000 to the Clovis Community College Alternative Teacher Licensure Program, according to officials.

The funds will enable the college to fully develop the licensure program, according to CCC officials.

Officials said the money will be used for program supplies, evaluations, marketing and professional development.

Clovis Community College and Clovis Municipal Schools are partners in the licensure program. Designed by the Public Education Department, similar programs exist on a state and national level, officials said.

The program was implemented at CCC in 2004, according to CCC Liberal Arts Division Chair Jan Lloyd.

“Clovis is not in a hardship, necessarily, for teachers. There are people with degrees in other areas, but not in teaching. This allows them to get that teaching degree,” Lloyd said.

Graduates of the program have been hired in Clovis schools and rural schools, Lloyd said.

Any person who has earned a bachelor’s degree and above is eligible for the alternative licensure program. Approximately seven classes must be taken to receive an alternative degree, Lloyd said. Students must also pass a state exam to teach in New Mexico public schools, she said.

Training for Boeing’s unmanned aerial vehicle, the ScanEagle, began in Clovis in July. Portions of the training are held at Clovis Community College.

ScanEagle flight tests are conducted at the Bombing Range.