GOP turning against war in Afghanistan

Freedom New Mexico

The tipping point in public support for America’s war in Afghanistan may end up being a statement earlier this month by Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele. He blurted out that the war in Afghanistan was “a war of Obama’s choosing” and “not something the United States had actively prosecuted or wanted to engage in.”

Actually, President George W. Bush started the war in 2001, originally to go after Osama bin Laden and other terrorists after the 9/11 attacks. The effort expanded to become yet another unwise American nation-building operation that has been disastrous and deadly. President Obama, however, has expanded the war in Afghanistan and even extended it into neighboring Pakistan.

After Steele spoke, Neoconservative leader William Kristol, editor of the Weekly Standard, called the remarks “more than an embarrassment” and demanded Steele’s resignation. And Talking Points Memo reported that, behind the scenes, numerous Republicans were trying to get rid of him.

Yet Steele remains in his post. “If they haven’t gotten rid of him by now, he’s safe,” said Justin Raimondo, editor of Antiwar.com and author of “Reclaiming the American Right,” a maverick history of the conservative and libertarian movements.

“It can’t have escaped people’s attention that Bill Kristol is attacking Steele, but Ron Paul is defending him — and he’s still there.”

Ron Paul, of course, is the libertarian Republican congressman who ran for president in 2008, warning then of the economic and military problems America now is suffering. “This is what people are saying in private, anyway, but they won’t come out in public and say it,” Raimondo said.

Americans also are seeing that the Afghanistan war and the Iraq war have been conducted at great cost, in dollars as well as in lives of Americans and others. The hundreds of billions of dollars spend on these wars has contributed to the record federal deficits of recent years.

“People on the streets recognize this — the tea partiers,” Raimondo said. He said the tea partiers mostly have been focused on economics. But now people see that “we’re bankrupt. Such people have more common sense than, say, members of Congress.”