Their view: Taxes necessary to maintain public services

Taxes necessary to maintain public services

I can sympathize with Kent McManigal’s anti-government stance in Friday’s Portales News-Tribune, but in the case of the Hotel Clovis there was no other entity that could keep the structure from continued deterioration.

Prospective owners, especially those who envision public housing or a nonprofit use for the facility are usually in need of government grants or local government participation in some form or another to complete and operate the project.

As I understand it private investors who just want to buy the building and return it to private functional use are non-existent.

I’m not in favor of low-income housing or any other form of housing within the building because of the lack of infrastructure in the neighborhood.

There is no local food store for instance.

Back 40 or 50 years ago, Main Street had everything from drug stores to Sears and even Woolworths. It could support the daily needs of local residents without a need to drive anywhere. The occupants of the Hotel Clovis will probably not have much use for title companies, antique shops, and craft stores.

I do take exception to McManigal’s opinion of taxes as “stolen money.” Taxes are necessary in order to maintain public roads, parks, and other things that we all take for granted. Somebody has to pay for traffic lights, police patrols, fire services, and so on.

Back when I briefly worked for a Florida county I was amazed at how much federal tax money went to local municipalities in the form of government grants.

Clovis has benefited by grant money due to hard work on the part of city and county officials who became aware of specific grants and filled out the paperwork to justify receiving them.

I hope a productive use can be made of the Hotel Clovis with or without government participation.