Curry County livestock auction tops $300,000

By Kevin Baird

kbaird@cnjonline.com

For one teen, auctioning his prize steer wasn’t all about the money.

“I’m going to miss him,” Tristan Lockmiller said while patting his steer Monopoly on the shoulder, shortly after auctioning off his grand champion steer Friday night at the Curry County Fair’s Junior Livestock Auction at the Curry County Events Center. “He’s one of my best friends.”

 CMI staff photo: Kevin Baird Morgan Borden of Grady awaits auctioning off her sheep named Weeman, who ended up selling for $2,100. She named Weeman after a character from the movie “Jackass.”


CMI staff photo: Kevin Baird
Morgan Borden of Grady awaits auctioning off her sheep named Weeman, who ended up selling for $2,100. She named Weeman after a character from the movie “Jackass.”

Lockmiller, 17, who lives in Ranchvale and attends Texico High School, said it is good to become attached to your animals because he believes they show you more respect.

Lockmiller was happy for the money though. The $6,750 Monopoly generated was the largest sum of the entire auction.

According to Auction Clerk Jodi Clark 93 animals were auctioned for $303,975.

In 2012, 112 animals sold for $285,000 and in 2011, 113 animals brought in about $300,000.

Bidders are given a packet prior to the auction listing each youngster’s name, Future Farmers of America or 4-H club designation, animal, fair placing, show weight and market value.

Successful bidders can pay the auction price and keep the animal, or send it off to market and pay the difference. In either case, the entire auctioned amount goes to the youth.

Morgan Borden, 14, of Grady said she named her sheep, Weeman, after the dwarf stuntman from the “Jackass” movies.

She said she plans on buying more sheep for next year with the $2,100 she earned on Weeman.

Borden said she entered five sheep into competitions and she said she won $60 for three second-place sheep in the breed in-county category.

She said she also won ribbons for second, third, fourth (two) and fifth place in other categories.

Dalton Davis, 16, attends Clovis High School. He sold his pig for $2,100, which he plans to invest in more show pigs and steers. He said he has been raising pigs his whole life and prefers pigs to steers mostly because he knows more about them.

“ My favorite thing is getting the pigs ready for the fair so that somebody will say ‘Wow, that’s a great pig,’ on their first view.” Davis says he tends to his pigs three times per day.

Davis said he won first place in the Cross Breeds pig class.

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